Theories of Counseling-Psychoanalytic

Theories of Counseling-Psychoanalytic

All of us in the field of counseling and theories of counseling owe a great debt to the ground breaking work of Sigmund Freud.

Had the unconscious not been discovered, at least the way he discovered it, none of us would have jobs.

Human kind has always attempted to explain behavior and meaning, through tools such as mythology, shamanism, and astrology, but until Freud and his successors, there was never a theory of mind, and certainly no science of helping, no theory of counseling.

It is not my purpose here to discuss the huge amount of controversy and research and the various schools of psychoanalysis, but to provide a beginning point for your own search.

Without Freud though, we would still be doing mesmerization in the parlor.

The following material is from Wikipedia, and the link follows.

"Psychoanalysis is a body of ideas developed by Austrian physician Sigmund Freud and his followers, which is devoted to the study of human psychological functioning and behavior. It has three applications:

1. a method of investigation of the mind; 2. a systematized set of theories about human behavior; and 3. a method of treatment of psychological or emotional illness.[1]

Under the broad umbrella of psychoanalysis there are at least 22 different theoretical orientations regarding the underlying theory of understanding of human mentation and human development. The various approaches in treatment called "psychoanalytic" vary as much as the different theories do. In addition, the term refers to a method of studying child development.

Freudian psychoanalysis refers to a specific type of treatment in which the "analysand" (analytic patient) verbalizes thoughts, including free associations, fantasies, and dreams, from which the analyst formulates the unconscious conflicts causing the patient's symptoms and character problems, and interprets them for the patient to create insight for resolution of the problems.

The specifics of the analyst's interventions typically include confronting and clarifying the patient's pathological defenses, wishes and guilt. Through the analysis of conflicts, including those contributing to resistance and those involving transference onto the analyst of distorted reactions, psychoanalytic treatment can clarify how patients unconsciously are their own worst enemies: how unconscious, symbolic reactions that have been stimulated by experience are causing symptoms.

History of the Psychoanalystic Counseling Theory

 1 History

Psychoanalysis is a body of ideas developed by Austrian physician Sigmund Freud and his followers, which is devoted to the study of human psychological functioning and behavior. It has three applications:

1. a method of investigation of the mind; 2. a systematized set of theories about human behavior; and 3. a method of treatment of psychological or emotional illness.[1]  

Under the broad umbrella of psychoanalysis there are at least 22 different theoretical orientations regarding the underlying theory of understanding of human mentation and human development. The various approaches in treatment called "psychoanalytic" vary as much as the different theories do. In addition, the term refers to a method of studying child development.

Freudian psychoanalysis refers to a specific type of treatment in which the "analysand" (analytic patient) verbalizes thoughts, including free associations, fantasies, and dreams, from which the analyst formulates the unconscious conflicts causing the patient's symptoms and character problems, and interprets them for the patient to create insight for resolution of the problems.

The specifics of the analyst's interventions typically include confronting and clarifying the patient's pathological defenses, wishes and guilt. Through the analysis of conflicts, including those contributing to resistance and those involving transference onto the analyst of distorted reactions, psychoanalytic treatment can clarify how patients unconsciously are their own worst enemies: how unconscious, symbolic reactions that have been stimulated by experience are causing symptoms.

Wikipedia Psychoanalysis

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